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Drawing on an assessment of the needs of rural women in Senegal, Mali, Liberia, Malawi and Haiti, and on an ecosystem mapping and market dialogue process, these infographics illustrate the challenges that rural women face to access resilience-building services that are tailored to their needs, and provide insights into gender-responsive policy measures and innovative solutions to respond to the women’s needs and build their resilience to climate change and disasters.
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The purpose of the Global Minimum Set of Gender Indicators is to develop a common statistical measurement framework that could be used for the national production and international compilation of gender statistics and to track progress across countries and regions.
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UNWomen, in collaboration with International Medical Corps (IMC), has been implementing a Programme on Women’s Empowerment in Sexual, Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child and Adolescent Health (SRMNCAH) Rights (POWER) in humanitarian settings in Gambella Region. The purpose of the action research is to document the progress on the SRMNCAH programme implemented in the humanitarian setting, lessons learned from it, gaps in it and efforts required for it. The findings will better inform UN Women and partners working in a humanitarian setting on the current progress and the efforts required to improve SRMNCAH services in the refugee and host communities.
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This study explains why it is important to integrate a gender perspective into assessments of all the SDGs, and also shows how to approach this task as a way to enhance gender mainstreaming across the 2030 Agenda.
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Consistent integration of a gender perspective into each SDG requires that the methodological approaches used to analyse targets should be capable of identifying gender inequality concerns in the ‘gender silent’ targets and when mapping interlinkages between them. Ths toolkit adresses sustinability issues by providing SDG researchers, analysts, and policy experts with the necessary tools to incorporate gender considerations throughout their Agenda 2030 related work.
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The report “Lessons Learned, Promising Practices, & Challenges to Overcome” provides first-hand experiences from the eight African countries implementing the Spotlight Initiative in ending violence against women and girls.
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The study's overarching aim is to provide reliable estimates of the economic costs of IPV in Ethiopia. The research underscores the high costs of IPV for women, households, the government, and the broader society of Ethiopia. By examining the impact on both the individual and society, the study highlights the tangible and intangible costs associated with VAWG more broadly, which can greatly help to inform policy and economic priorities.
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The survey informs the trends to evidence-based and demand-driven approach for ESARO publications. The survey also informs various publication processes, including the implementation of quality assurance guidance and the centralization of the publication process with stronger accountability mechanisms for knowledge production.
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The study was undertaken using Local Government (LG)’s election data from the Electoral Commission and survey data collected through key informant interviews with political leaders at the LG levels and focus group discussions with community people. The survey was conducted in Gulu, Nwoya, and Pader in the North; Napak, and Morotoin Karamoja sub-region; Pallisa and Bugiri in the East; and Kiryandongo in the West. Survey data was analysed using both quantitative (descriptive statistics) and qualitative techniques, which involved qualitative data from focus group discussions and open-ended survey responses from individual respondents was analysed through the following steps: transcribing the qualitative responses; pooling the transcribed responses from the various FGDs according to specific research questions; identifying the main ideas that occur in the answers to each question and creating themes; and writing narratives to describe the themes.
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The baseline survey on unpaid care work status among women and men in eight districts of Rwanda seeks to understand the care-related dynamics in households, this study utilized both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Drawing on Oxfam’s Household Care Survey (HCS) and the Harvard Analytical Framework (also referred to as the Gender Roles Framework). The survey helps to understand how women, men and children spend their time, how care activities are distributed in the household and the access that households have to basic public services and infrastructure that facilitate their everyday survival. The study also explored the social norms that shape power relations and gender division of care labor.
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The study covers Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, and Uganda. It finds that NEET rates in ESA are above 40 percent for youth in the 20-24 years age bracket, that young women in the region are disproportionally affected by NEET status regardless of their age group, and that this status is more likely to become a permanent state for young women than for young men.
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The study covers Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, and Uganda. It finds that NEET rates in ESA are above 40 percent for youth in the 20-24 years age bracket, that young women in the region are disproportionally affected by NEET status regardless of their age group, and that this status is more likely to become a permanent state for young women than for young men.
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The current drought response in Ethiopia is being scaled up across sectors, including food security, nutrition assistance, provision of safe water and sanitation, and livelihood protection. In addition, other urgent humanitarian assistance to drought- stricken areas such as agriculture and livestock support for pastoralist communities are also being increased. Nonetheless, the needs of women and girls may not be met due to a number of compounding factors such as the breakdown of key services which are critical to the health, protection, and recovery of women and girls; weakened informal and formal protection and accountability mechanisms; disrupted livelihoods, increased displacement, power imbalances, and limited access to resources.
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This study builds on UN Women’s achievements and experience in supporting women and girls during the COVID pandemic within the East and Southern Africa Region and other parts of the world.
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The WPS programme under evaluation with the title “Women lead and benefit from sustainable and inclusive peace and security in Uganda” was developed against a backdrop of conflict and post-conflict situations in Uganda including the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda noting that even though there is no active war, the limited engagement in transitional justice including reconciliation and reparations, has remained a severe challenge, with little accountability for atrocities committed during the 20- year civil war.
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This study focuses on Uganda and forms part of a series covering 9 countries in East and Southern Africa. It uses existing statistical data to identify the factors that determine whether a young woman or man (aged 15-24) are not in employment, education or training.
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This study focuses on Rwanda and forms part of a series covering 9 countries in East and Southern Africa. It uses existing statistical data to identify the factors that determine whether a young woman or man (aged 15-24) are not in employment, education or training.
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This study focuses on Namibia and forms part of a series covering 9 countries in East and Southern Africa. It uses existing statistical data to identify the factors that determine whether a young women or man (aged 15-24) are not in employment, education or training. This study focuses on Namibia and forms part of a series covering 9 countries in East and Southern Africa. It uses existing statistical data to identify the factors that determine whether a young women or man (aged 15-24) are not in employment, education or training. 
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This study focuses on Malawi and forms part of a series covering 9 countries in East and Southern Africa. It uses existing statistical data to identify the factors that determine whether a young woman or man (aged 15-24) are not in employment, education or training.
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This study focuses on Kenya and forms part of a series covering 9 countries in East and Southern Africa. It uses existing statistical data to identify the factors that determine whether a young women or man (aged 15-24) are not in employment, education or training.